Isle of Mull

Isle of Mull

The Isle of Mull in Scotland sits just off the country’s west coast and is the second-largest island of the Inner Hebrides. It is one of the best places to marvel at the abundant Scottish wildlife, explore historic ruins, and discover stunning beaches! There are many things to do in Isle of Mull, making it an excellent holiday destination!

The whole island also offers excellent places to stay, from self-catering accommodation to luxury hotels, so you’re always well-rested and ready for a new day.

Navigating the island is easy, and you can bring your vehicle using car ferry services or try the car hire services near the ferry terminal – either way, you’ll be cruising along the island’s roads in no time! Most people travel through the Morvern peninsula and hop on a ferry from there.

The Isle of Mull has been a marvellous holiday getaway for visitors and is perfect for anyone who wants a break from the hustle and bustle of life.



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Things to do in Mull

Things to do in Mull

If you’re coming to the Isle of Mull for a relaxed and chill vacation, then be our guest! But you’d miss out on the island’s many exhilarating and fascinating attractions.

Mull is revered for its wildlife and is considered a sanctuary for some of the rarest species in Scotland. You can take a boat trip out and go whale watching, see dolphins leap from the water, watch the sea eagles roost on the cliffside, and many more wondrous sights. Mull is also home to gorgeous beaches that put the Bahamas to shame, as well as fantastic cultural and historical sites dotted across the island just waiting for you to explore them.

It’s easy to be overwhelmed by the number of activities and attractions on the island. See our guide for the top things to do in Isle of Mull.

Enjoy the Isles of Mull

The Isle of Mull is home to a significant number of great islands around, all with a great many things to do. You can find most of them just off of the west coast, and any visit to Mull is incomplete without checking out at least a few.

Luckily, reaching them is pretty easy, and they’re a short boat trip or ferry away. The Mull Peninsula and Calgary Bay are great jumping-off points to see the hidden gems that are just off of Mull. Here are some of our favourites:

Isle of Staffa

Isle of Staffa

The Isle of Staffa is famous for its fascinating basalt columns and puffin colony, just a short trip aboard a boat from the south-west of Ulva.

Visiting Staffa is an adventure of a lifetime, with every step along the way presenting something new to see. The most notable attraction on the island is Fingal’s Cave, which you can sail right into when the weather conditions are right.

Isle of Erraid

Isle of Erraid

Wait too long, and you’ll miss visiting one of the most exciting islands near Mull, the elusive Isle of Erraid!

The Isle is a tidal island, which means that the island is only an island during high tide and accessible by walking during low tide. The island is owned by the Findhorn Foundation, a charitable Scottish community. They’re interested in maintaining the island as a bastion of conservation and you can join their fantastic community to visit Erraid while in Mull.

Isle of Ulva

Isle of Ulva

Hop on the Ulva Ferry and see the wonderful Isle of Ulva, filled with impressive historical ruins and things to do!

The neighbouring island of Ulva is separated from Mull by a thin strait of water, so it’s easy to hop aboard a ferry and sail across. Otherwise, you can cross a bridge that connects Ulva to Gometra. Ulva is sparsely populated, but there are immense historical sites and a small village to visit here.

The Trenish Isles

The Trenish Isles

Home to puffins, basalt columns, and many more attractions, the Tresnish Isles are stunning to behold.

Take one of the many boat trips to this mystical series of islands and skerries just west of Mull, and you’ll come across breathtaking views of Scotland’s untamed wilderness. You can’t miss out on this scenic route while on the Isle of Mull.

Calgary Bay Beach

Calgary Bay Beach

One of the many hidden gems of the Isle of Mull is hidden in the long sweep of Calgary – the beautiful Calgary Beach!

This accessible beach is like a secret paradise and a gorgeous way to enjoy a picnic when the sun shines on this bit of Calgary Bay. The sands here are rich in calcium and grow a unique variety of flowers and flora for you to see, so make sure to stop by and enjoy some time at Calgary Bay!

If the summer sun is shining while you’re in Mull, make sure to come to Calgary Beach!

Tobermory Distillery

Tobermory Distillery

This unique Hebridean distillery is amongst the colourful houses that dot the seafront of Tobermory, the largest settlement and main town of Mull.

This unique distillery aims to bring the heart and culture of the Isle of Mull into its delicious whisky. Established in 1790, the Tobermory Distillery has been brewing Isle of Mull unpeated liquor for just as long. Not only that, the distillery is known for its gin as well as its whisky, so make sure to grab a tasting after touring this new distillery and see why this distillery is considered a popular destination here.

Duart Castle

Duart Castle

Welcome to the historic home of Clan MacLean, Duart Castle, which has been the seat for this powerful clan for over 700 years!

Overlooking the Sound of Mull, you can quite honestly spend an entire afternoon exploring this home. And if you’re getting peckish, then fret not because you can enjoy some time at the Tea Room at Duart Castle, which serves some of the finest meals created from delicious local produce cultivated on the Isle of Mull.

Come and see the historic home of Clan MacLean in the stunning castle of Duart.

Mull Eagle Watch

Mull Eagle Watch

If you’re on the Isle of Mull from April to September, you’ll have a chance to spot white-tailed eagles!

You can book a trip with Mull Eagle Watch and come and see the beautiful and graceful white-tailed eagles. Whether aboard one of the Watch’s boat trips or around the lochs of Mull, this is a wildlife-watching experience that you can’t miss out on!

Climb Ben More

Climb Ben More

No matter where you are on the Isle of Mull, it’s pretty likely that you’ll be able to see Ben More towering over the horizon.

Ben More is the highest mountain on the Isle of Mull, over a kilometre tall and has a distinct triangular shape that gives this mountain a unique look! There are ample routes around Ben More for hikers, walkers, and trail-blazers to enjoy. It’s best to tackle this mountain on a clear day and to always include the necessities with you when you begin your ascent.

At the summit, you’ll be treated to views of the entire island! If you’re outdoorsy, then Ben More should be at the top of your bucket of things to do.

Eas Fors Waterfall

Eas Fors Waterfall

Cascading down the Isle of Mull is one of the most spectacular waterfalls, which you can see a couple of miles north of Ulva Ferry.

When heavy rains come, the Eas Fors Waterfall erupts water from three points and is a stunning visual that will stick with you for a lifetime. The final third section of the waterfall is a magnificent 100-foot drop into the ocean below!

There is a bit of a hike to reach the waterfall, but it is well worth visiting.

Aros Park

Aros Park

While in the town of Tobermory in Mull, Aros Park serves as the beautiful back garden – complete with ferns, waterfall, and floral delights!

Walking through this veritable Garden of Eden is one of the most refreshing trails you can undertake, and any children you take along will love the play trail found here! Whether for a picnic or even taking a fishing trip onto the park’s Loch, a trip to the lovely Aros Park will be one of your highlights in Tobermory Bay!

Mull Museum

Mull Museum

Unlock the Isle of Mull’s past when visiting the Mull Museum in Tobermory, the island’s largest settlement!

The Mull Museum is crammed with exciting artefacts, exhibits, and information that brings Mull’s history to the forefront in an easy and accessible way. The Museum is run by volunteers who are experts and would be happy to answer any questions you may have for them.

Keep in mind the museum is open from April to October, so make sure to plan accordingly if you want to enjoy the sights of this incredible attraction.

Knockvologan Beach

Knockvologan Beach

The calm, expansive sands of Knockvologan Beach are gorgeous to behold and a top attraction while visiting Mull.

Just by Fionnphort, Knockvologan Beach has everything you’d ever want – clean white sands, beautiful blue waters, and spectacular surrounding islands! In fact, during low tide, you can reach Erraid Island from its sands.

No wonder this beach was the inspiration for Robert Louis Stevenson’s Kidnapped! Take some time at this magnificent beach and you might be inspired yourself.

Langamull Beach

Langamull Beach

Langamull Beach is truly one of the hidden gems of Mull, but you’d be forgiven for mistaking it for a beach in the Caribbean.

You can find this lovely beach just off the beaten track. You’ll know you’ve found it when you see a beach with beautiful white sands, crystal clear waters, and dark rocks in the backdrop.

There are hidden coves for you to explore, but even bringing a blanket and picnic basket guarantees a great day out with the family! Budding historians will also see one of Mull’s oldest settlements, Kildavie, nearby.

MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree

MacCulloch's Fossil Tree

The product of volcanic activity millions of years ago, you can come to see the impression of MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree when you’re in Mull.

The Fossil Tree walk is a 14-mile trail hike that is not for the faint of heart and includes fascinating geology along the path. But for those who undertake the walk, it’s well worth it when you see the outline of the Fossil Tree hidden within the cliffs that were formed by lava flows millions of years ago.

MacCulloch’s Fossil Tree is undoubtedly one of the fascinating attractions you can see on the Isle of Mull.

Mull Aquarium

Mull Aquarium

Experience the vast array of sea life in the waters around Scotland at the Mull Aquarium.

The Mull Aquarium has octopuses, fish, crustaceans, shellfish, and even more unique wildlife that you would otherwise never see on a holiday. It’s a great place to take the family for a few hours, even more so when you realise that the Mull Aquarium offers experiences to touch and learn about the fascinating ocean creatures.

You can check out the Mull Aquarium in Tobermory, Isle of Mull – your gateway to the sea life of the islands.

Lip na Cloiche Garden & Nursery

Lip na Cloiche Garden & Nursery

Regularly featuring in top garden magazines, Lip na Cloiche Garden & Nursery is a beautiful garden that sits near the shores of Mull.

The gardens contain gorgeous flowers, herbs, and beautiful trees to explore. The gardens are open to the public and make for an excellent day out for friends and family, offering spectacular views of the ocean and islands around Mull.

If you’re especially enjoying the Gardens, why not pick up a potted friend to take home with you!

The Crofter’s Kitchen & Gardens

The Crofter's Kitchen & Gardens

Travelling to Kintra without anything good to eat? Stop by the fantastic Crofter’s Kitchen & Gardens for Mull’s finest seasonal produce.

Many travellers stumble across Crofter’s without planning to and end up discovering one of the best local kitchens on the island. From fresh-baked bread, traditional deli meats, and even a choice of delicious local produce, you’ll be craving more as soon as you leave their cosy kitchen!

You’ll be spoilt for choice at these unique Kitch & Gardens, and make sure to try the cakes and treats.

Carsaig Arches

Carsaig Arches

Carsaig Arches is an extremely popular destination hiking trail that ends with a picturesque view of the natural arches that make up Carsaig’s cliffside.

Although this trail is undoubtedly one of the most popular, it is pretty tricky, with the 8-mile distance taking you through rocky and narrow cliff paths as well as vertigo-inducing drops. Always gauge the weather correctly, pack appropriately, and go with a group!

Otherwise, if you’re well-equipped and keen to see one of the Isle’s best natural attractions, the Carsaig Arches await.

Mackinnon’s Cave

Mackinnon's Cave

One of the most ominous and mysterious attractions you can find while visiting the Isle of Mull is Mackinnon’s Cave, which was discovered in 1773.

After a short hike, you will reach Mackinnon’s Cave, a place of incredible lava formations and deep cave systems. Mackinnon’s Cave is one of the deepest caves in the Hebrides, so there are naturally going to be far-flung theories about its contents. Rumours of hermits, cave monsters, and darkness are common but there’s nothing to worry about – the panorama views of the island are too good to miss out on.

These cave systems are utterly fascinating and bring an immense sense of curiosity to whoever delves into them, but always make sure to take caution.

Mull Theatre

Mull Theatre

Based in Druimfin, just outside Tobermory, this centre of the arts is one of the best places to catch the talented and artistic films of Scottish filmmakers.

The theatre always has some excellent performances year-round; you can find anything from musical operas, comedies, and immersive cinematic movies. If you have a spare evening or afternoon, catching a performance at the excellent Mull Theatre is a great way to dive into Scottish films and music.

The Mull Theatre is sure to have something for everyone, so check their website to find out what’s on.

Hebridean Whale & Dolphin Trust

Hebridean Whale & Dolphin Trust

Voyage out with the Hebridean Whale & Dolphin Trust to discover the hidden wildlife that sits below the waves of Mull.

Not only is this Hebridean Trust dedicated to conserving sea life, but they are more than happy to take you aboard and sightsee some of these creatures. It’s not uncommon to spot breaching whales and prancing dolphins along your voyage, as well as many other beautiful creatures that populate the waves of Mull.

With boat trips through this Hebridean Trust, you get a fantastic experience and contribute to the conservation of the creatures you see – what more could you ask for!

Ardalanish Isle of Mull Weavers

Ardalanish Isle of Mull Weavers

Ardalanish sits near the southern tip of the Isle of Mull, with the Ardalanish Isle of Mull Weavers Farm just a short drive from the southernmost point of the island.

This 1,500-acre farmland is home to cattle, sheep, horses, and even a few dogs, but the show’s real star is the beautifully woven products that the farm makes. If you want a deeper look into the authentic craftsmanship that’s been a part of the Isle of Mull for many generations, look no further than a visit to the Isle of Mull Weavers in Ardalanish!

Best of all, you can take your favourite piece home as a souvenir with complete confidence that you’re supporting a great business.

Calgary Art in Nature

Calgary Art in Nature

The fantastic Calgary Art in Nature exhibit is one of the most famous attractions in Mull, attracting thousands of visitors every year with its artworks, sculptures, and contemporary vision.

The installations are all reachable through walking tours that show off the union of art and nature, with carved sculptures in trees, decorated crafts made from natural and recycled materials, and repurposed houses and boats.

Every corner reveals new surprises and joys to behold and makes this attraction one you should be putting at the top of your list!

Macquarie’s Mausoleum

Macquarie's Mausoleum

See the historic Mausoleum on the island of Mull, which Australia technically owns!

Considered by some to be the father of Australia, General Macquarie was one of the most influential people when stabilising Australia’s early colonies. If you’re an Australian visiting the Isle of Mull, check out this well-kept mausoleum.

Kilmore Standing Stones

Kilmore Standing Stones

Should you be near the town of Dervaig on the Isle of Mull, ensure you take some time to see the standing stones.

The Kilmore Standing Stones are hidden in the forests of Dervaig. Out of the five that once stood, only two of them remain now. Nevertheless, these 8-foot stones are a marvel to see and create a glimpse into the ancient past of Mull.

Whether these were placed here as a ritual to an unknown deity or as a monument to someone is unknown, but perhaps you’ll discover their meaning when you visit!

Loch Torr Wildlife Hide-In

Loch Torr Wildlife Hide-In

Interested in surveying the wildlife of Mull & Iona without disturbing nature? The Loch Torr Wildlife Hide-In will shoot to the top of your to-do list.

At the Hide-In, experts teach you about the vast types of wildlife that make their home near Loch Torr. With binoculars, it’s easy to spot gliding eagles, bathing otters, thirsty deer, and a whole host of other wildlife!

You can drop in at the Hide-In any time during the day, so feel free to spot by multiple times as you explore the other attractions of the Isle of Mull.

Tobermory Golf Club

Tobermory Golf Club

At the top of Tobermory Bay sits Tobermory Golf Club, one of the best 9-hole golf courses in Scotland!

Just because you’re on the Isle of Mull doesn’t mean you can’t practise your drives while you’re treated to some of the most stunning views of the Mull Peninsula. The dramatic coastline certainly is one of this course’s highlights, but don’t forget to stop by the club’s restaurant and bar to cap off your day with a few pints.

The Tobermory Golf Club is an excellent selection for the discerning golfer who doesn’t want to get rusty over their holiday to the Isle of Mull.

Fingal’s Cave

Fingal's Cave

On the uninhabited island of Staffa lies the mysterious Fingal’s Cave, a peculiar attraction you can see while within the Inner Hebrides.

The striking part of Fingal’s Cave is the symmetrical basalt columns in front of the cave’s entrance, which provide an even further air of curiosity. The cave is regularly filled with water, so exploring the cave is impossible on foot.

This is one attraction that is best seen catching one of the many boat trips that leave Mull’s harbour.

Iona Abbey & Nunnery

Iona Abbey & Nunnery

The sacred island of Iona sits just off the south shore of Mull and welcomes all stressed visitors onto the blessed isle of Iona.

Iona Abbey & Nunnery provides a memorable atmosphere to all who visit the island, and it’s one of the best places to recover from the hustle and bustle of life. The Abbey was built in the 13th century, standing proudly for three centuries before becoming a place of active worship today.

The island also features four distinctive crosses that tower and draw crowds of visitors every day. Honestly, Iona Island is worth an entire day to explore on its own, and there are many things to do just a Mull ferry ride away.

Dun Ara Castle

Travel about 8 kilometres north west of Tobermory, and you’ll happen upon Dun Ara Castle, encircled by the thick layer of limestone and rock.

This attraction of the northwest coast is just a stop’s throw away from the Glengorm estate and a scenic route to enjoy a walking tour through. You’ll receive views of not only this terrifically fortified castle but also of the Ardnamurchan Peninsula, Coll, Rum, and the Uists.

The Castle even has a ruined harbour to its southwest, with even more to explore around every corner of the structure.

Standing Stone Glengorm

Standing Stone Glengorm

Near Glengorm Castle sits three peculiar standing stones, offering travellers who visit Mull an opportunity to get up close and personal with these objects.

The standing stones are prehistoric, likely dating back to the Bronze Age! Of the five standing stones, only three remain, of which two were recently re-erected in 1942.

While checking in at the magnificent Glengorm Castle, these standing stones are the cherry-on-top attraction that will elevate your day further!

Port na Ba

Port na Ba

North West Mull has a lot to offer, but a trip to Port na Ba will make you fall in love with Scottish beaches even more!

The first thought that comes to most when they see Port na Ba is unspoilt, with perfect white sand beaches, tranquil waves, and a spectacular view of the western coast of Mull and beyond.

Port na Ba is quite close to the town of Durvaig, so keep it in mind when the next beautiful sunny day pops out in the outer Hebrides.

The Picture Gallery

The Picture Gallery

The picturesque town of Tobermory is the cultural hub of Mull, and there’s no better example of that than a visit to the Picture Gallery.

A collection of paintings and art from Ronnie Leckie & Aska Marzec, famed artists, can be seen from the window as you walk past coffee shops on cobblestone streets. You can find bismuth bowls and art resin, fossils, gems, and all sorts of unique gifts and treasures you can take home with you as a souvenir.

Otherwise, you’re welcome to appreciate the beautiful art and immerse yourself in the talent of local artists.

Isle of Mull Cheese

Isle of Mull Cheese

Just outside the city of Tobermory Bay is an attraction that will have turophiles absolutely over the moon!

Isle of Mull Cheese always has an outstanding stock of cheeses and is the last remaining traditional farmhouse cheese maker in the Hebridean islands! From smoked cheese to the classic Hebridean Blue, you can’t go wrong with an afternoon of sampling some of the best cheeses that the Isle of Mull has to offer!

Make sure to take a cheese board with you because you’ll be craving this divine delicacy wherever you go next.

Cycle Mull

Cycle Mull

One of the best ways to explore the Isle of Mull is by bike!

Don’t believe us? The Isle of Mull has excellent roads, but you’ll eventually find that you have to do a bit of offroading to reach the best attractions. Luckily, Cycle Mull lets you grab yourself two wheels to fully unlock the second largest island in the Inner Hebrides.

They have a wide selection, allowing you to choose between electric and manual. It’s easy to navigate Mull’s stunning towns and roads when taking a bicycle and it’s perfect for a casual day on the island – just as it was meant to be!

The Coffee Pot

The Coffee Pot

We’ve barely spoken about the town of Salen, which may make you think it’s not worth visiting, but the Coffee Pot will convince you otherwise!

The Coffee Pot’s selection of fine roast brews and cakes, and other sweet treats will have your jaw-dropping to the floor. It’s the perfect addition to exploring the island of Mull and the best place to end a long day of trying the things to do on the Isle of Mull!

After a quick bite at the Coffee Pot, you’ll be returning to Salen’s town sooner than you think – that’s a fact!

Go Kayaking

Kayaking

There’s nothing quite like putting a paddle on the water and exploring the wide-reaching coastline of Mull in a kayak.

If you’re feeling particularly adventurous, why not try sea kayaking? Interesting sights include whale watching aboard your kayak and seeing dolphins, but keep an eye out for the basking sharks that call the west coast of Mull their home.

If that’s too tricky for you, you can have a much more peaceful voyage through the lochs and beaches of Mull, like Loch na Keal, Loch Scridain, Traigh Ghael Beach, and more. You’ll even have a chance to see golden eagles and hidden spots all over the island!

Lochbuie Standing Stones

Lochbuie Standing Stones

Amongst the boggy fields of Ben Buie sits the Lochbuie Standing Stones, granite structures that go back to the ancient world Scotland was 2000-years-ago!

Out of the nine original stones, eight remain, with the final one being removed and replaced with a low boulder instead. These standing stones tower about a person’s height and serve as a fascinating mystery, much like the other standing stones, of why precisely they were placed here.

When you come to the Isle of Mull, will you discover these stones’ secret? There is only one way to find out!

St Kilda’s Scottish Episcopal Church

St Kilda's Scottish Episcopal Church

Visit St Kilda’s Church near Lochbuie in Mull, a stunning church with a mysterious history.

Taking a tour through the lovely Episcopal Church is a treat for anyone in the Lochbuie area. The church is home to extraordinary stained glass windows depicting figures like St Columba, another prominent figure in Scotland. Interestingly, no one truly knows if a St Kilda existed or why this church was built when Lochbuie already had the service of another…

With mysteries and a beautiful interior, a trip to see this church should be on your bucket list while you’re in Mull.

Shiaba Ruins

Shiaba Ruins

Near Ross of Mull lies the ruined township of Shiaba and one of the best parts of a day outing on the island.

This settlement dates back to the 1800s and is an important historical site since it proves that people lived on the Isle of Mull during this time! You can explore 12 ruined buildings, walls, gardens, and even cottages. Grab a picnicked lunch and eat amongst the living history of Scotland right in front of your very eyes!

The Shiaba Cottage is likely the most well-preserved attraction here, as it has its roof, walls, and even the fireplace inside fully intact. You won’t be able to take as good of a glance into history as you can at Shiaba, so make sure to visit this attraction!

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